Duopa efficacy: pivotal study

DUOPA significantly reduced "off" time and increased “on” time without troublesome dyskinesia vs oral carbidopa/levodopa immediate release (IR)1

In a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, parallel-group, phase 3 study of 71 patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease who were levodopa responsive and had persistent motor fluctuations while on oral carbidopa/levodopa IR and other Parkinson's medications…1,5,*

  • 90% relative reduction in mean daily "off" time with Duopa (–4.0 hours) compared with oral carbidopa/levodopa IR (25/100 mg) (–2.1 hours)6

  • 86% relative increase in mean daily “on” time without troublesome dyskinesia with Duopa (+4.1 hours) compared with oral carbidopa/levodopa IR (+2.2 hours)6

Change in mean daily “off” timea and “on” time without troublesome dyskinesiaa,b during 16-hour infusion period: from baseline to Week 121

aNormalized to 16-hour awake period based on a Parkinson’s disease diary in which “off” time, “on” time without dyskinesia, “on” time with nontroublesome dyskinesia, and “on” time with troublesome dyskinesia were recorded.5

bDefined as “on” time without dyskinesia plus “on” time with nontroublesome dyskinesia.5

cLeast squares mean change from baseline based on analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).1

*Including dopaminergic agonists, catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) inhibitors, and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors.1

Expand

Baseline mean daily "off" time: 6.3 hours, Duopa; 6.9 hours, oral carbidopa/levodopa IR1

Baseline mean daily "on" time without troublesome dyskinesia: 8.7 hours, Duopa; 8.0 hours, oral carbidopa/levodopa IR1

Important Safety Information1

The most common adverse events for DUOPA, with an incidence at least 7% greater than oral carbidopa-levodopa immediate release (CLIR), were (DUOPA vs. CLIR): complication of device insertion (57% vs 44%), nausea (30% vs 21%), depression (11% vs 3%), peripheral edema (8% vs 0%), hypertension (8% vs 0%), upper respiratory tract infection (8% vs 0%), oropharyngeal pain (8% vs 0%), atelectasis (8% vs 0%), and incision site erythema (19% vs 12%).

  • Mean daily dose of levodopa1:

    • 1117 mg with Duopa

    • 1351 mg with oral carbidopa/levodopa IR

Pivotal study design

aOral carbidopa/levodopa IR could be taken if needed at night.6

bAllowed therapies included dopaminergic agonists, COMT inhibitors, and MAO-B inhibitors, but excluded carbidopa/levodopa controlled release, levodopa/benserazide, and apomorphine.6

cPercutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal tube.

Expand
  • Objective: comparison between Duopa and oral carbidopa/levodopa IR (25/100 mg) in mean change from baseline to Week 12 over 16 hours based on Parkinson’s disease diary data for1,5:

    • Primary endpoint: total daily "off" time

    • Secondary endpoint: total daily "on" time without troublesome dyskinesia†,‡

"Off" time and "on" time were based on Parkinson's disease diary data and were normalized to a 16-hour awake period and 16-hour daily infusion.1
Defined as "on" time without dyskinesia plus "on" time with nontroublesome dyskinesia.5

Baseline patient characteristics

  • Inclusion criteria included:

    • Clear responsiveness to levodopa1

    • ≥3 hours of "off" time1,§

    • Recognizable "off" and "on" state (motor fluctuations)5,§

    • History of adequate trial of Parkinson’s therapy5,||

  • Exclusion criteria included6:

    • Significant cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination score <24, Alzheimer’s disease, or other dementia)

    • Previous neurosurgery for Parkinson’s disease

    • Acute psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, or troublesome hallucinations

    • Sleep attacks

    • Clinically significant impulsive behavior (eg, gambling, hypersexuality)

    • Acute stroke within 6 months

Pivotal study: baseline patient characteristics1,6

a Age range: 39 to 83 years.6

bCollected in patient diary during 3 days prior to randomization and after 28 days of preexisting oral therapies dose optimization on outpatient basis.6

c"Off" time range: 3.8 to 11.4 hours, Duopa; 3.8 to 11.5 hours, oral carbidopa/levodopa IR.6

d"On" time without troublesome dyskinesia range: 3.0 to 12.2 hours, Duopa; 0.0 to 12.2 hours, oral carbidopa/levodopa IR.6

§Confirmed by a Parkinson’s disease diary for each of 3 consecutive days.6

||Defined in judgment of the investigator as an adequate trial of carbidopa/levodopa, a dopaminergic agonist, and at least one other class of antiparkinsonian therapy (COMT or MAO-B inhibitor).5

Expand

Change in mean daily “off” timea and “on” timea without troublesome dyskinesiaa,b during 16-hour infusion period: from baseline to Week 121

aNormalized to 16-hour awake period based on a Parkinson’s disease diary in which “off” time, “on” time without dyskinesia, “on” time with nontroublesome dyskinesia, and “on” time with troublesome dyskinesia were recorded.5

bDefined as “on” time without dyskinesia plus “on” time with nontroublesome dyskinesia.5

cLeast squares mean change from baseline based on analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).1

*Including dopaminergic agonists, catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) inhibitors, and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors.1

aOral carbidopa/levodopa IR could be taken if needed at night.6

bAllowed therapies included dopaminergic agonists, COMT inhibitors, and MAO-B inhibitors, but excluded carbidopa/levodopa controlled release, levodopa/benserazide, and apomorphine.6

cPercutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal tube.

Pivotal study: baseline patient characteristics1,6

a Age range: 39 to 83 years.6

bCollected in patient diary during 3 days prior to randomization and after 28 days of preexisting oral therapies dose optimization on outpatient basis.6

c"Off" time range: 3.8 to 11.4 hours, Duopa; 3.8 to 11.5 hours, oral carbidopa/levodopa IR.6

d"On" time without troublesome dyskinesia range: 3.0 to 12.2 hours, Duopa; 0.0 to 12.2 hours, oral carbidopa/levodopa IR.6

§Confirmed by a Parkinson’s disease diary for each of 3 consecutive days.6

||Defined in judgment of the investigator as an adequate trial of carbidopa/levodopa, a dopaminergic agonist, and at least one other class of antiparkinsonian therapy (COMT or MAO-B inhibitor).5

Indication and Important Safety Information1-3

DUOPA enteral suspension is indicated for the treatment of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease.

DUOPA is contraindicated in patients who are currently taking or have taken (within 2 weeks) a nonselective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, as concurrent use can cause hypertension. A Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy with Jejunal Extension (PEG-J) is contraindicated with lack of transillumination/positive needle aspiration test; intestinal obstruction; sepsis; peritonitis; serious coagulation disorders; ascites; and neoplastic, inflammatory, and infiltrative diseases of the gastric and abdominal walls.

Because DUOPA is administered using a PEG-J or naso-jejunal tube, gastrointestinal complications can occur, including bezoar; ileus; implant site erosion/ulcer; intestinal hemorrhage, ischemia, obstruction, or perforation; intussusception; pancreatitis; peritonitis; pneumoperitoneum; and wound infection, any of which may require surgery or be fatal. Instruct patients to immediately report abdominal pain, prolonged constipation, nausea, vomiting, fever, or melanotic stool.

Patients treated with levodopa (a component of DUOPA) have reported falling asleep while engaged in activities of daily living, including the operation of motor vehicles, which sometimes resulted in accidents. Although many of these patients reported somnolence while on levodopa, some perceived that they had no warning signs (sleep attack), such as excessive drowsiness, and believed they were alert immediately prior to the event. For this reason, prescribers should reassess patients for drowsiness or sleepiness in DUOPA-treated patients, especially since some of the events occur well after the start of treatment. Advise patients about the potential to develop drowsiness with DUOPA and ask about factors that may increase risk of somnolence. Consider discontinuing DUOPA in patients who report significant daytime sleepiness or episodes of falling asleep during activities that require active participation. For these patients, if a decision is made to continue DUOPA, advise them to avoid driving and other potentially dangerous activities that might result in harm if the patients become somnolent.

Monitor patients for orthostatic hypotension, especially after starting DUOPA or increasing the dose.

There is an increased risk for hallucinations, psychosis, and confusion in patients taking DUOPA. Hallucinations associated with levodopa may present shortly after the initiation of therapy and may be responsive to dose reduction of levodopa. Patients with a major psychotic disorder should not be treated with DUOPA.

Patients may experience intense urges while on DUOPA. Because patients may not recognize these behaviors as abnormal, it is important for prescribers to ask patients or their caregivers specifically about the development of new or increased gambling urges, sexual urges, uncontrolled spending, binge or compulsive eating, or other urges while on DUOPA. Consider reducing the dose or discontinuing DUOPA if a patient develops such urges.

Depression has been reported in patients treated with DUOPA. Monitor patients for depression and concomitant suicidal tendencies.

Withdrawal-emergent hyperpyrexia and confusion, a symptom complex that resembles neuroleptic malignant syndrome (characterized by elevated temperature, muscular rigidity, altered consciousness, and autonomic instability), with no other obvious etiology, has been reported in association with rapid dose reduction, withdrawal, or change in dopaminergic therapy. Avoid sudden discontinuation or rapid dose reduction of DUOPA.

DUOPA may cause or exacerbate dyskinesias, which may require a dose reduction of DUOPA or other Parkinson's disease medications.

Generalized polyneuropathy has been reported in patients receiving DUOPA. Assess patients for the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy before and periodically after starting DUOPA, especially patients with pre-existing neuropathy, patients taking medications, or those who have medical conditions associated with neuropathy.

Myocardial infarction and arrhythmia were reported in patients taking carbidopa-levodopa. Ask patients about symptoms of ischemic heart disease and arrhythmia, especially those with a history of myocardial infarction or cardiac arrhythmias.

Parkinson's disease patients have a higher risk of developing melanoma than the general population and should be monitored periodically for melanoma.

DUOPA may increase the risk for elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK). Patients taking levodopa may have increased levels of catecholamines and their metabolites in plasma and urine, giving false positive results that suggest the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma.

Monitor patients with glaucoma after starting DUOPA, as it may cause increased intraocular pressure.

Drug Interactions: Monitor patients taking selective MAO-B inhibitors and carbidopa-levodopa for orthostatic hypotension. Concurrent administration with antihypertensives may result in postural hypotension, necessitating a dose reduction of the antihypertensive. Co-administration with dopamine D2 antagonists, isoniazid, or iron salts may reduce effectiveness of DUOPA.

The most common adverse events for DUOPA, with an incidence at least 7% greater than oral carbidopa-levodopa immediate release (CLIR), were (DUOPA vs. CLIR): complication of device insertion (57% vs 44%), nausea (30% vs 21%), depression (11% vs 3%), peripheral edema (8% vs 0%), hypertension (8% vs 0%), upper respiratory tract infection (8% vs 0%), oropharyngeal pain (8% vs 0%), atelectasis (8% vs 0%), and incision site erythema (19% vs 12%).

Please see full Prescribing Information.

References: 1. DUOPA [package insert]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 2. AbbVie PEG Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Kit [instructions for use]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 3. AbbVie J Intestinal Tube 9 FR for PEG 15 and 20 FR [instructions for use]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 4. Nyholm D, Odin P, Johansson A, et al. AAPS J. 2013;15(2):316-323. 5. Olanow CW, Kieburtz K, Odin P, et al; for LCIG Horizon Study Group. Lancet Neurol. 2014;13(2):141-149. 6. Data on file, AbbVie Inc. Study S187-3-001/S187-3-002. 7. Obeso JA, Olanow CW, Nutt JG. Trends Neurosci. 2000;23(10 suppl):S2-S7. 8. Chaudhuri KR, Rizos A, Sethi KD. J Neural Transm. 2013;120(9):1305-1320. 9. Stocchi F, Tagliati M, Olanow CW. Mov Disord. 2008;23(suppl 3):S599-S612. 10. Coelho M, Ferreira JJ. Nat Rev Neurol. 2012;8(8):435-442.

Legal Notices/Privacy Policy. ©2016 AbbVie Inc. North Chicago, IL 60064. If you have any questions about AbbVie's DuopaPro.com website that have not been answered, click here. This website and the information contained herein is intended for use by US physicians only and is provided for informational purposes only.

Indication and Important Safety Information1-3

DUOPA enteral suspension is indicated for the treatment of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease.

DUOPA is contraindicated in patients who are currently taking or have taken (within 2 weeks) a nonselective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, as concurrent use can cause hypertension. A Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy with Jejunal Extension (PEG-J) is contraindicated with lack of transillumination/positive needle aspiration test; intestinal obstruction; sepsis; peritonitis; serious coagulation disorders; ascites; and neoplastic, inflammatory, and infiltrative diseases of the gastric and abdominal walls.

Because DUOPA is administered using a PEG-J or naso-jejunal tube, gastrointestinal complications can occur, including bezoar; ileus; implant site erosion/ulcer; intestinal hemorrhage, ischemia, obstruction, or perforation; intussusception; pancreatitis; peritonitis; pneumoperitoneum; and wound infection, any of which may require surgery or be fatal. Instruct patients to immediately report abdominal pain, prolonged constipation, nausea, vomiting, fever, or melanotic stool.

Patients treated with levodopa (a component of DUOPA) have reported falling asleep while engaged in activities of daily living, including the operation of motor vehicles, which sometimes resulted in accidents. Although many of these patients reported somnolence while on levodopa, some perceived that they had no warning signs (sleep attack), such as excessive drowsiness, and believed they were alert immediately prior to the event. For this reason, prescribers should reassess patients for drowsiness or sleepiness in DUOPA-treated patients, especially since some of the events occur well after the start of treatment. Advise patients about the potential to develop drowsiness with DUOPA and ask about factors that may increase risk of somnolence. Consider discontinuing DUOPA in patients who report significant daytime sleepiness or episodes of falling asleep during activities that require active participation. For these patients, if a decision is made to continue DUOPA, advise them to avoid driving and other potentially dangerous activities that might result in harm if the patients become somnolent.

Monitor patients for orthostatic hypotension, especially after starting DUOPA or increasing the dose.

There is an increased risk for hallucinations, psychosis, and confusion in patients taking DUOPA. Hallucinations associated with levodopa may present shortly after the initiation of therapy and may be responsive to dose reduction of levodopa. Patients with a major psychotic disorder should not be treated with DUOPA.

Patients may experience intense urges while on DUOPA. Because patients may not recognize these behaviors as abnormal, it is important for prescribers to ask patients or their caregivers specifically about the development of new or increased gambling urges, sexual urges, uncontrolled spending, binge or compulsive eating, or other urges while on DUOPA. Consider reducing the dose or discontinuing DUOPA if a patient develops such urges.

Depression has been reported in patients treated with DUOPA. Monitor patients for depression and concomitant suicidal tendencies.

Withdrawal-emergent hyperpyrexia and confusion, a symptom complex that resembles neuroleptic malignant syndrome (characterized by elevated temperature, muscular rigidity, altered consciousness, and autonomic instability), with no other obvious etiology, has been reported in association with rapid dose reduction, withdrawal, or change in dopaminergic therapy. Avoid sudden discontinuation or rapid dose reduction of DUOPA.

DUOPA may cause or exacerbate dyskinesias, which may require a dose reduction of DUOPA or other Parkinson's disease medications.

Generalized polyneuropathy has been reported in patients receiving DUOPA. Assess patients for the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy before and periodically after starting DUOPA, especially patients with pre-existing neuropathy, patients taking medications, or those who have medical conditions associated with neuropathy.

Myocardial infarction and arrhythmia were reported in patients taking carbidopa-levodopa. Ask patients about symptoms of ischemic heart disease and arrhythmia, especially those with a history of myocardial infarction or cardiac arrhythmias.

Parkinson's disease patients have a higher risk of developing melanoma than the general population and should be monitored periodically for melanoma.

DUOPA may increase the risk for elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK). Patients taking levodopa may have increased levels of catecholamines and their metabolites in plasma and urine, giving false positive results that suggest the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma.

Monitor patients with glaucoma after starting DUOPA, as it may cause increased intraocular pressure.

Drug Interactions: Monitor patients taking selective MAO-B inhibitors and carbidopa-levodopa for orthostatic hypotension. Concurrent administration with antihypertensives may result in postural hypotension, necessitating a dose reduction of the antihypertensive. Co-administration with dopamine D2 antagonists, isoniazid, or iron salts may reduce effectiveness of DUOPA.

The most common adverse events for DUOPA, with an incidence at least 7% greater than oral carbidopa-levodopa immediate release (CLIR), were (DUOPA vs. CLIR): complication of device insertion (57% vs 44%), nausea (30% vs 21%), depression (11% vs 3%), peripheral edema (8% vs 0%), hypertension (8% vs 0%), upper respiratory tract infection (8% vs 0%), oropharyngeal pain (8% vs 0%), atelectasis (8% vs 0%), and incision site erythema (19% vs 12%).

Please see full Prescribing Information.

References: 1. DUOPA [package insert]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 2. AbbVie PEG Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Kit [instructions for use]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 3. AbbVie J Intestinal Tube 9 FR for PEG 15 and 20 FR [instructions for use]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 4. Nyholm D, Odin P, Johansson A, et al. AAPS J. 2013;15(2):316-323. 5. Olanow CW, Kieburtz K, Odin P, et al; for LCIG Horizon Study Group. Lancet Neurol. 2014;13(2):141-149. 6. Data on file, AbbVie Inc. Study S187-3-001/S187-3-002. 7. Obeso JA, Olanow CW, Nutt JG. Trends Neurosci. 2000;23(10 suppl):S2-S7. 8. Chaudhuri KR, Rizos A, Sethi KD. J Neural Transm. 2013;120(9):1305-1320. 9. Stocchi F, Tagliati M, Olanow CW. Mov Disord. 2008;23(suppl 3):S599-S612. 10. Coelho M, Ferreira JJ. Nat Rev Neurol. 2012;8(8):435-442.

Legal Notices/Privacy Policy. ©2016 AbbVie Inc. North Chicago, IL 60064. If you have any questions about AbbVie's DuopaPro.com website that have not been answered, click here. This website and the information contained herein is intended for use by US physicians only and is provided for informational purposes only.

Indication and Important Safety Information1-3

DUOPA enteral suspension is indicated for the treatment of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease.

DUOPA is contraindicated in patients who are currently taking or have taken (within 2 weeks) a nonselective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, as concurrent use can cause hypertension. A Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy with Jejunal Extension (PEG-J) is contraindicated with lack of transillumination/positive needle aspiration test; intestinal obstruction; sepsis; peritonitis; serious coagulation disorders; ascites; and neoplastic, inflammatory, and infiltrative diseases of the gastric and abdominal walls.

Because DUOPA is administered using a PEG-J or naso-jejunal tube, gastrointestinal complications can occur, including bezoar; ileus; implant site erosion/ulcer; intestinal hemorrhage, ischemia, obstruction, or perforation; intussusception; pancreatitis; peritonitis; pneumoperitoneum; and wound infection, any of which may require surgery or be fatal. Instruct patients to immediately report abdominal pain, prolonged constipation, nausea, vomiting, fever, or melanotic stool.

Patients treated with levodopa (a component of DUOPA) have reported falling asleep while engaged in activities of daily living, including the operation of motor vehicles, which sometimes resulted in accidents. Although many of these patients reported somnolence while on levodopa, some perceived that they had no warning signs (sleep attack), such as excessive drowsiness, and believed they were alert immediately prior to the event. For this reason, prescribers should reassess patients for drowsiness or sleepiness in DUOPA-treated patients, especially since some of the events occur well after the start of treatment. Advise patients about the potential to develop drowsiness with DUOPA and ask about factors that may increase risk of somnolence. Consider discontinuing DUOPA in patients who report significant daytime sleepiness or episodes of falling asleep during activities that require active participation. For these patients, if a decision is made to continue DUOPA, advise them to avoid driving and other potentially dangerous activities that might result in harm if the patients become somnolent.

Monitor patients for orthostatic hypotension, especially after starting DUOPA or increasing the dose.

There is an increased risk for hallucinations, psychosis, and confusion in patients taking DUOPA. Hallucinations associated with levodopa may present shortly after the initiation of therapy and may be responsive to dose reduction of levodopa. Patients with a major psychotic disorder should not be treated with DUOPA.

Patients may experience intense urges while on DUOPA. Because patients may not recognize these behaviors as abnormal, it is important for prescribers to ask patients or their caregivers specifically about the development of new or increased gambling urges, sexual urges, uncontrolled spending, binge or compulsive eating, or other urges while on DUOPA. Consider reducing the dose or discontinuing DUOPA if a patient develops such urges.

Depression has been reported in patients treated with DUOPA. Monitor patients for depression and concomitant suicidal tendencies.

Withdrawal-emergent hyperpyrexia and confusion, a symptom complex that resembles neuroleptic malignant syndrome (characterized by elevated temperature, muscular rigidity, altered consciousness, and autonomic instability), with no other obvious etiology, has been reported in association with rapid dose reduction, withdrawal, or change in dopaminergic therapy. Avoid sudden discontinuation or rapid dose reduction of DUOPA.

DUOPA may cause or exacerbate dyskinesias, which may require a dose reduction of DUOPA or other Parkinson's disease medications.

Generalized polyneuropathy has been reported in patients receiving DUOPA. Assess patients for the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy before and periodically after starting DUOPA, especially patients with pre-existing neuropathy, patients taking medications, or those who have medical conditions associated with neuropathy.

Myocardial infarction and arrhythmia were reported in patients taking carbidopa-levodopa. Ask patients about symptoms of ischemic heart disease and arrhythmia, especially those with a history of myocardial infarction or cardiac arrhythmias.

Parkinson's disease patients have a higher risk of developing melanoma than the general population and should be monitored periodically for melanoma.

DUOPA may increase the risk for elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK). Patients taking levodopa may have increased levels of catecholamines and their metabolites in plasma and urine, giving false positive results that suggest the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma.

Monitor patients with glaucoma after starting DUOPA, as it may cause increased intraocular pressure.

Drug Interactions: Monitor patients taking selective MAO-B inhibitors and carbidopa-levodopa for orthostatic hypotension. Concurrent administration with antihypertensives may result in postural hypotension, necessitating a dose reduction of the antihypertensive. Co-administration with dopamine D2 antagonists, isoniazid, or iron salts may reduce effectiveness of DUOPA.

The most common adverse events for DUOPA, with an incidence at least 7% greater than oral carbidopa-levodopa immediate release (CLIR), were (DUOPA vs. CLIR): complication of device insertion (57% vs 44%), nausea (30% vs 21%), depression (11% vs 3%), peripheral edema (8% vs 0%), hypertension (8% vs 0%), upper respiratory tract infection (8% vs 0%), oropharyngeal pain (8% vs 0%), atelectasis (8% vs 0%), and incision site erythema (19% vs 12%).

Please see full Prescribing Information.

References: 1. DUOPA [package insert]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 2. AbbVie PEG Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Kit [instructions for use]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 3. AbbVie J Intestinal Tube 9 FR for PEG 15 and 20 FR [instructions for use]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 4. Nyholm D, Odin P, Johansson A, et al. AAPS J. 2013;15(2):316-323. 5. Olanow CW, Kieburtz K, Odin P, et al; for LCIG Horizon Study Group. Lancet Neurol. 2014;13(2):141-149. 6. Data on file, AbbVie Inc. Study S187-3-001/S187-3-002. 7. Obeso JA, Olanow CW, Nutt JG. Trends Neurosci. 2000;23(10 suppl):S2-S7. 8. Chaudhuri KR, Rizos A, Sethi KD. J Neural Transm. 2013;120(9):1305-1320. 9. Stocchi F, Tagliati M, Olanow CW. Mov Disord. 2008;23(suppl 3):S599-S612. 10. Coelho M, Ferreira JJ. Nat Rev Neurol. 2012;8(8):435-442.

Legal Notices/Privacy Policy. ©2016 AbbVie Inc. North Chicago, IL 60064. If you have any questions about AbbVie's DuopaPro.com website that have not been answered, click here. This website and the information contained herein is intended for use by US physicians only and is provided for informational purposes only.

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